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Why Seeds Are So Good For You

Why Seeds Are So Good For You

Although tiny, seeds offer a substantial amount of nutrients. They are jam packed with nutrients such as protein, fibre, iron, vitamins and omega-3 fatty acids. Seeds are a staple in many vegan and raw food recipes and a wonderful alternative to your regular snacks.

Seeds can be mixed into salads, smoothies, granola bars, crackers, yogurts, etc. They can be blended into a paste and made into salad dressing or dips. Seeds can also be turned into a delicious raw seed milk. They are also amazing just simply snacked on. Seeds offer our bodies so much nutrients, it’s time we eat more!

Chia Seeds

These little seeds are incredibly nutritious, with significant concentrations of protein, fiber and several essential minerals. They are also high in Omega-3, antioxidants, B-Vitamins, calcium, and boron. There are so many good reasons to start eating chia seeds right now, some of which include:

-Omega-3 fatty acids- They are the richest plant source of Omega-3’s (the vital fats that protect against inflammation such as arthritis and heart disease).

-Help with weight loss- fight hunger by mixing chia seeds with water. They form a coating of gel, increasing its size and weight. Since the gel is made from water, it has no calories. This helps your body to think it’s full, without adding any calories.

-Help your concentration and improve your mood: Chia is an excellent source of essential fatty acids, which are crucial for concentration and other brain functions.

They can also benefit you by:

  • Increasing energy levels
  • Cleanse the colon
  • Lowering risk of heart disease
  • Prolongs hydration
  • Helps IBS
  • Balance blood sugar
  • Prevent cravings

Hemp Seeds

Hemp seeds are a high, whole food protein source containing all nine essential amino acids. They also include essential fats, Gamma Linoleic Acid (GLA), fiber, iron, zinc, carotene, B-Vitamins (1, 2, and 6), Vitamin D, Vitamin E, calcium, copper, potassium, chlorophyll, enzymes and more.

Hemp seeds can be eaten by those unable to tolerate nuts, gluten, and lactose. Hemp seeds are naturally gluten-free, making them a great alternative to wheat products. Making these seeds very popular amongst people with celiac disease or gluten sensitivities.

Benefits of Hemp Seeds:

  • Increases weight loss
  • Lowers cholesterol
  • Increases and sustains energy
  • Reduces inflammation in the body
  • Lowers blood pressure
  • Great source of plant based protein
  • High in vitamins and minerals
  • Rich in chlorophyll and enzymes

Flax Seeds

Flax Seeds provide us with healthy omega-3 fatty acids, which are essential for normal body functions. The Omega-3 fatty acids in flax help fight inflammation in the body, which plays a part in many diseases including arthritis, asthma, diabetes, heart disease and even some cancers. They are also critical for heart health, brain development, lowering cholesterol, preventing depression, and reducing joint pain.

Flax seeds are very high in soluble and insoluble fiber. Fiber is essential in our diets, helping to stabilize blood sugar, promoting proper function of the intestines, balancing hormones and eliminating toxins.

Benefits of Flax Seeds:

  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Aid in digestion
  • Lower cholesterol
  • Prevent Depression
  • Reduce joint pain
  • Healthy brain development
  • Prevent disease

Pumpkin Seeds

Raw pumpkin seeds are a great source of magnesium, zinc, plant-based omega-3 fats and iron. They are great for the immune system, prostate health, the heart and the liver. They also contain anti-inflammatory properties and tryptophan for a restful night’s sleep!

Benefits of Pumpkin Seeds:

  • Reduce risk of colds
  • Prevent headaches
  • Aids in depression
  • Promotes strong bones and muscles
  • Improve bladder function
  • Lowers cholesterol
  • Lowers blood pressure

SOURCE FOR THIS ARTICLE:

http://www.onegreenplanet.org/natural-health/why-seeds-are-natures-farmacy-for-health/

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